About DCCD

DCCD Initiatives & SA 2020

About SA2020

The mission of SA2020 is to “catalyze the entire San Antonio community into passionate, focused, and sustained action to achieve the shared goals that will transform San Antonio into a world-class city by the year 2020 in eleven key vision areas.” In 2011 the Department for Culture & Creative Development became the Strategic Lead Partner for Arts & Culture, focusing on the following indicators:

  • Economic impact of the arts
  • Level of funding for arts programs
  • Level of attendance at arts programs
  • Level of citizen satisfaction with San Antonio arts and cultural activities

Since that time the department has worked on reviewing its arts funding guidelines, supported studies to enhance arts access to all parts of the community, expanded its global cultural exchange initiatives, and enhanced arts educational opportunities to help drive the community conversation on arts and culture. In 2012 the DCCD, in partnership with SA2020, released a public survey to determine how the City is aligning its arts and cultural efforts with the SA2020 vision for San Antonio to "lead the world as a creative community" and to gauge residents' opinions on the state of the local cultural life. By connecting individual and business resources to nonprofits working in these areas, SA2020 will transform San Antonio into one of America’s most exceptional cities by 2020. Read the report based on the survey results and the letter from SA2020 President & CEO Darryl Byrd and DCCD Director Felix Padrón.

 SA2020 Arts & Culture Survey Report

Arts in the 11 Causes

Arts and culture are intertwined through each of the SA2020 causes.

  • A recent government study showed that students of low socioeconomic status who were involved in drama and music had better grades and lower dropout rates.
  • Better-educated and high-achieving workers contribute directly to greater economic competitiveness and civic engagement.
  • Blighted neighborhoods come back to life thanks to an influx of artists and public art displays, leading to greater public safety and opportunities for physical activity.

Find out how DCCD is working to answer the SA2020 call for a world-class city by 2020 and see how you can help. You can also search by cause area and find a list of opportunities available in the community on the SA2020 site.

San Antonio’s Creative Economy

What is the “Creative Economy”?
The creative economy includes the full range of the arts and culture: fine arts as well as popular, ethnic, commercial and design arts. It also includes cultural events, such as festivals and celebrations, concerts and dances in the parks, and the preservation of history and heritage. It encompasses all individuals, businesses and nonprofit organizations that directly or indirectly produce cultural products or services. Also, thinkers and doers trained, whether formally or informally, in specific cultural and artistic skills.

Creative individuals include visual artists, performing artists, designers, media artists, film makers, arts educators, craftspeople, architects, writers, production technicians, volunteers and others.

Creative businesses include advertising, marketing, architecture, design, digital media, music and dance clubs, art galleries, art-related retail stores, film production and post-production, art-related printer, live theaters, festivals, and others.

Creative nonprofits include all types of arts and cultural organizations, professional and volunteer association, arts-related departments within a college or university, and others.

  • In 2011, the combined economic impact of San Antonio’s creative industry was over $4 billion, up from $3.4 billion in 2006. The industry employed nearly 30,000 workers, an impressive increase from the nearly 12,000 employees in 2006. Read the San Antonio Creative Industry 2011 Report.
  • The creative industry provides a foundation for overall economic development in the region.
  • It seems reasonable to expect that if regional economies are to be competitive on both the national and global scales, they will need to foster the development of the creative industry and the artistic dividend it yields to its fullest extent. According to Forbes, 74% of executive workers seek “vibrant cultural opportunities” when choosing a place to live and work.
  • We are seeing the emergence of the design economy – the successor of the information economy.

 Creative Industry Report

Poet Laureate

In keeping with the SA2020 goal of turning San Antonio into a renowned creative community, in 2012 Mayor Julián Castro appointed Dr. Carmen Tafolla as the city’s first Poet Laureate. In April 2014, Laurie Ann Guerrero took her place for a two-year term. Nominations are solicited from the community over a period of several months and a selection panel of writers from around the country reviews all materials to recommend an appointee.

A poet laureate leads to a greater appreciation and understanding of poetry, enhances literacy initiatives, and provides an opportunity to preserve and express our local culture through the written and spoken word.

The duties of the San Antonio Poet Laureate, who serves a two-year term, will include hosting events to promote poetry and the literary arts in conjunction with organizations such as Gemini Ink and the Department for Culture and Creative Development.

Laurie Ann Guerrero, the 2014 San Antonio Poet Laureate, was selected from a pool of seven nominees. Guerrero received her B.A. from Smith College and an M.F.A. from Drew University in 2011. In 2012, she received the Andres Montoya Poetry Prize for her first full-length collection, “A Tongue in the Mouth of the Dying” which was later published by the University of Notre Dame Press in 2013.

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